False Narratives Opioids and Xarelto

Mass Tort Nexus is compiling an evidentiary package for law firms who intend to reject the current Xarelto settlement offer and prepare for trial. This article represents an extremely small segment of what any firm who prepares for trial will have at their disposal; however, we believe most everyone involved in Mass Torts might find the following topic interesting.

It is well known how Big Pharma allegedly promoted a false narrative regarding Opioids and the risk posed by these highly addictive drugs. Despite the fact that thousands of people were dying every year from opioid overdose, doctors seemed unaware that the narrative they had bought into was false.

What might the death toll ultimately be for the new anticoagulants?

We are aware that both the Xarelto primary defendants are also accused of being party to the opioid false narrative conspiracy in opioid litigation complaints.  If Big Pharma can keep doctors prescribing opioids like skittles for decades, despite the rising death toll, how hard could it be to keep doctors prescribing an anticoagulant with a few tweaks to the truth?

Why Did Doctors Prescribe Xarelto and Why do they Continue to Prescribe Xarelto?

The clinical trials for Xarelto did not prove the drug to be superior in efficacy to Warfarin, only “non inferior.” It was not a better drug from an efficacy stand point. Doctors had no reason to switch patients to Xarelto because it “worked better” than Warfarin.

Xarelto is exponentially more expensive that Warfarin, so doctors had to reason to switch patients to Xarelto based on cost.

What were the makers of Xarelto able to claim about their new (unproven in the general patient population) to convince them to switch patients to Xarelto?

  1. No Routine Blood Testing (monitoring.)
  2. No Dietary Restrictions.

What if these claims were false, patients do need routine blood monitoring while on Xarelto?

What if patients taking Xarelto do need to restrict their diet (not consume certain food products?)

Would doctors keep prescribing Xarelto? Probably not, if the arguably false narrative first presented to them was corrected (warned) as having been false. That said, once a claim is made, people, including doctors, are not likely to realize that the claim is no longer being made once they have bought into the claim, unless they are specifically informed that the claim might have been false.

The following will explain why the makers of Xarelto may have stopped claiming (in their television and print ads,) that patients taking Xarelto did not need routine blood testing nor adhere to any dietary restrictions.

We will first review Xarelto television spots beginning in 2013 and more recent ads. Then we will explain why the makers of Xarelto quit claiming that users of their product stopped claiming that:

  1. No Routine Blood Testing (monitoring) was needed.
  2. No dietary restrictions.

You may view a larger selection of ads than those provided below at: https://www.ispot.tv/brands/ISA/xarelto

2013: Xarelto Bob Ad  (both “no routine monitoring” and “no dietary restrictions claims made”.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7dJt/xarelto-bob

Start at 16 Seconds, “Bob took Wafarin and made a monthly trip to the clintic to get his blood tested but not anymore.”

Start at  36 Seconds,   “Xarelto is the first and only once per day prescription blood thinner… That does not require rountine Blood Monitoring.”

Start at 57 Seconds, “and there’s no dietary restrictions…Bob can eat the health foods he likes. ”

2014 Mary Ad (both “no routine monitoring” and “no dietary restrictions claims made.”)

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/7pGC/xarelto-mary-song-by-arturo-cardelus

Start at 12 Seconds  “Which required monthly testing, but that’s history.”

Start at 56 Seconds “Plus with no Known Dietary Restrictions.”

2015  Arnold Palmer (they did not specifically say no routine testing and dietary restrictions, but they  implied the claims. )

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/AYGi/xarelto-game-plan-feat-chris-bosh-arnold-palmer-brian-vickers

Start at 29 Seconds (claims worked into general conversation)

article link: https://www.masstortnexus.com/News/366/Did-Xarelto-the-Drug-Arnold-Palmer-Promoted-Lead-to-His-Death?

2016: Jerry West (neither of the claims were made in this ad.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/ARh_/xarelto-high-risk-of-stroke-featuring-jerry-west

2017  Xarelto “Protect Themselves” ad feature authority figures  (neither of the claims were made in this ad.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/wtdp/xarelto-protect-themselves

2018  “Learn all you can ad” (we do not think irony was intended), (neither of the claims were made in this ad)

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://www.ispot.tv/ad/wPmP/xarelto-learn-all-you-can

So Why Did the Makers of Xarelto Quit Making Their “Claims to Fame?”

We will first address why the makers of Xarelto most likely stopped making the “no rountine blood testing (monitoring claim.) This answer to this one is easy; Because the FDA warned them about making this claim.

It is difficult to understand why the makers of Xarelto did not unilaterally determine (and warn that their original messaging no routine blood monitoring needed) might have been misleading based solely on the number of adverse events reported to the FDA since the product’s introduction.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

 

Food and Drug Administration

Silver Spring, MD 20993

Roxanne McGregor-Beck, Director

Johnson & Johnson International, Inc.

1000 Route 202 South

P.O. Box 300

Raritan, New Jersey 08869-0602

 

RE: NDA #202439

XARELTO (rivaroxaban) tablets

MA #215

Dear Ms. McGregor-Beck:

The Office of Prescription Drug Promotion (OPDP) of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has reviewed a direct-to-consumer (DTC) print advertisement (K02XS121040 AF) (Print Ad) for XARELTO (rivaroxaban) tablets (Xarelto) submitted by Johnson & Johnson International, Inc. (Johnson & Johnson) on behalf of Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. under cover of Form FDA 2253 and observed during routine surveillance in the January/February 2013 issue of WebMD magazine. The Print Ad is false or misleading because it minimizes the risks associated with Xarelto and makes a misleading claim. Thus, the Print Ad misbrands Xarelto in violation of the Federal Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act (FD&C Act), 21 U.S.C. 352(n) and FDA implementing regulations. 21 CFR 202.1(e)(5)(i); (e)(7)(viii), (ix).

Background:

Below is the indication and summary of the most serious and most common risks associated with the use of Xarelto.1 According to its FDA-approved product labeling (PI), in pertinent part:

Xarelto is indicated to reduce the risk of stroke and systemic embolism in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation.

There are limited data on the relative effectiveness of XARELTO and warfarin in reducing the risk of stroke and systemic embolism when warfarin therapy is well controlled.

 The PI for Xarelto contains Boxed Warnings regarding increased risk of stroke after discontinuation in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation and the risk of spinal/epidural

hematoma. The PI also contains Contraindications regarding active pathological bleeding and severe hypersensitivity reaction to Xarelto, as well as Warnings and Precautions regarding the risk of bleeding, use in patients with renal impairment and hepatic impairment, use with P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors or inducers, and risk of pregnancy related hemorrhage. The most common adverse reactions with Xarelto were bleeding complications.

Minimization of Risk Information

 Promotional materials are false or misleading if they fail to present risks associated with a drug with a prominence and readability reasonably comparable with the presentation of information relating to the benefits of the drug. Factors impacting prominence and readability include typography, layout, contrast, headlines, paragraphing, white space, and other techniques apt to achieve emphasis. The Print ad prominently presents various efficacy claims for Xarelto, such as, but not limited to, the following, that are presented in large, bolded and/or colorful text and graphics (emphasis original):

• “If you have atrial fibrillation (AFib)”

• “Ready to break your AFib routine?”

• “XARELTO® is the first and only once-a-day prescription blood thinner for patients with AFib not caused by a heart valve problem, that is proven to reduce

the risk of stroke—without routine blood monitoring.”

• “…With XARELTO®, there’s no routine blood monitoring—so you have more time for yourself. There are no dietary restrictions, so you’re free to enjoy the healthy foods you love. And there are no dosage adjustments, which means you can manage your risk with just one pill a day, taken with your evening meal. Learn how XARELTO® can help simplify your AFib-related stroke risk treatment….”

In contrast, the risk information is presented on the preceding adjacent page without any of the emphasis (i.e. color scheme, borders, layout, and graphics) used with the efficacy claims. The result is a presentation which appears unconnected to the efficacy claims and is therefore not likely to draw readers’ attention. This overall presentation misleadingly  minimizes the risks associated with Xarelto because it fails to convey this important risk information with a prominence and readability reasonably comparable to the efficacy claims. We note that the Print Ad contains the statement, “Please see accompanying Medication Guide on the following pages” (emphasis original) at the bottom of the page, and that risk information is presented on an adjacent page, but this is not sufficient to mitigate the overall misleading presentation.

Misleading Claim

 The Print Ad includes the following claim (emphasis original):

• “And there are no dosage adjustments…”

The above claim misleadingly suggests that dosage adjustments are not necessary with Xarelto. However, according to the DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION section of the PI, the dose should be lowered to 15 mg once daily for patients with renal impairment who may have a CrCL of 15 to 50 mL/min. In addition, the WARNINGS AND PRECAUTIONS section of the PI states, “…Periodically assess renal function as clinically indicated…and adjust therapy accordingly….” Thus, patients with renal impairment may need to have their dosage adjusted while on Xarelto therapy.

Conclusion and Requested Action

For the reasons discussed above, the Print Ad misbrands Xarelto in violation of the FD&C Act, 21 U.S.C. 352(n) and FDA implementing regulations. 21 CFR 202.1(e)(5)(i); (e)(7)(viii), (ix). OPDP requests that Johnson & Johnson immediately cease the dissemination of violative promotional materials for Xarelto such as those described above. Please submit a written response to this letter on or before June 20, 2013, stating whether you intend to comply with this request, listing all promotional materials (with the 2253 submission date) for Xarelto that contain violations such as those described above, and explaining your plan for discontinuing use of such violative materials.

Please direct your response to the undersigned at the Food and Drug Administration,

Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, Office of Prescription Drug Promotion, 5901-B Ammendale Road, Beltsville, Maryland 20705-1266 or by facsimile at (301) 847-8444. To ensure timely delivery of your submissions, please use the full address above and include a prominent directional notation (e.g. a sticker) to indicate that the submission is intended for OPDP. Please refer to MA# 215 in addition to the NDA number in all future correspondence relating to this particular matter. OPDP reminds you that only written communications are considered official. The violations discussed in this letter do not necessarily constitute an exhaustive list. It is your responsibility to ensure that your promotional materials for Xarelto comply with each applicable requirement of the FD&C Act and FDA implementing regulations.

Sincerely,

{See appended electronic signature page}

Zarna Patel, Pharm.D.

Regulatory Review Officer

Office of Prescription Drug Promotion

{See appended electronic signature page}

Amy Toscano, Pharm.D., RAC, CPA

Team Leader

Office of Prescription Drug Promotion

____________________________________________________________________________________

It is difficult to understand why the makers of Xarelto did not unilaterally determine (and warn that their original messaging (no routine blood monitoring needed) might have been misleading bases solely on the number of adverse events reported to the FDA since the products introduction.

 

 

 

 

 

https://fis.fda.gov/sense/app/d10be6bb-494e-4cd2-82e4-0135608ddc13/sheet/59a37af8-d2bb-4dee-90bf-6620b1d5542f/state/analysis

 

 

 

 

 

 

https://fis.fda.gov/sense/app/d10be6bb-494e-4cd2-82e4-0135608ddc13/sheet/59a37af8-d2bb-4dee-90bf-6620b1d5542f/state/analysis

Having not corrected their prior claims (warned) related to the need for routine blood testing (monitoring) the makers of Xarelto did add the words underlined (below) to the label for Xarelto NDA -022406 in November of 2018. This statement in no way corrects the arguably false prior statements related to “No Routine Blood Testing” needed.  This statement simply warns that many of the common “blood monitoring tests used” are not recommended for individuals using Xarelto. A more accurate statement might have been: “These tests have no diagnostic value for individuals on Xarelto,” as the drug skews the test, and not in a predictable fashion, which would allow for adjustment of the test results.

Do these two statements seem the same to you?

  1. No Routine Blood Monitoring Needed with Xarelto.
  2. The test routinely used for anticoagulation monitoring has no diagnostic value for individuals taking Xarelto.

Which of the above two statements would likely increase revenues from the drug and which one would likely have the opposite effect?

11/07/2018 (SUPPL-29)

Approved Drug Label (PDF)

5 Warnings and Precautions

5.2 Risk of Bleeding

Reversal of Anticoagulant Effect

Additions and/or revisions underlined:

… anticoagulant activity of rivaroxaban. Use of procoagulant reversal agents, such as prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), activated prothrombin complex concentrate or recombinant factor VIIa, may be considered but has not been evaluated in clinical efficacy and safety studies. Monitoring for the anticoagulation effect of rivaroxaban using a clotting test (PT, INR or aPTT) or anti-factor Xa (FXa) activity is not recommended.

https://www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/cder/safetylabelingchanges/index.cfm?event=searchdetail.page&DrugNameID=287

“Now We Turn to “No Dietary Restrictions Necessary”

 06/28/2017 (SUPPL-23)

Approved Drug Label (PDF)

5 Warnings and Precautions

5.2 Risk of Bleeding

(additions underlined)

(excerpts)

5.6 Use with P-gp and Strong CYP3A4 Inhibitors or Inducers

(additions underlined)

Avoid concomitant use of XARELTO with known combined P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors.

Avoid concomitant use of XARELTO with drugs that are known combined P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inducers.

7 Drug Interactions

7.1 General Inhibition and Induction Properties

(additions underlined)

Rivaroxaban is a substrate of CYP3A4/5, CYP2J2, and the P-gp and ATP-binding cassette G2 (ABCG2) transporters. Combined P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inhibitors increase exposure to rivaroxaban and may increase the risk of bleeding. Combined P-gp and strong CYP3A4 inducers decrease exposure to rivaroxaban and may increase the risk of thromboembolic events.

7.2 Drugs that Inhibit Cytochrome P450 3A4 Enzymes and Drug Transport Systems

Interaction with Combined P-gp and Moderate CYP3A4 Inhibitors in Patients with Renal Impairment

XARELTO should not be used in patients with CrCl 15 to <80 mL/min who are receiving concomitant combined P-gp and moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors (e.g., erythromycin) unless the potential benefit justifies the potential risk.

End excerpt

What is the significance of the above?

The inducers make the user more susceptible to clots (ischemic stroke, DVT, PE, etc.)

The inhibitors make the user more likely to bleed.

On a side note, the GI tract is significant to the actions of CYPE4A as well as P-gp. And if you remember from above, what was the most reported AE with Xarelto:

 

So what does the use of Strong and Moderate CYP34A and P-gp Inhibitors and Inducers have to do with dietary restrictions?

Most everyone is familiar with the fact that some drugs carry a warning about restricting grapefruit juice from your diet while on the given drug (i.e. statins).

The relation to the above and the “no dietary restrictions” claim, that the makers of Xarelto use to promote their drug (and then stopped making but did not correct the narrative) is simple. There are numerous foods which are CYP34A, and P-gp inhibitors and/or inducers. We provide a small sampling of foods and dietary supplements below.

The dietary restrictions associated with Warfarin restricted foods high in Vitamin K, like Kale (yummy Kale).

Xarelto Potential Food Restrictions

It is worth nothing that due to genetic differences, the strength of a given CYP34A and P-gp Inhibitor or Inducer necessary to interfere with a drug is not the same for everyone. Women as a general rule are more susceptible to the effects of CYP34A and P-gp Inhibitors or Inducers than men.

Grape Fruit Juice: Inhibits CYP34A and P-gp Seville Orange Juice CYP34A and P-gp
Lime Juice Inhibits CYP34A Lemon Juice Inhibits CYP34A
Pomegranate Juice Inhibits CYP34A Star Fruit Juice Inhibits CYP34A
Kiwi Juice Inhibits CYP34A Passion Fruit Juice Inhibits CYP34A
 St. John’s wort Induction of P-gp Ginkgo Biloba Induces P-gp

 In addition to food interactions Approximately 50% of prescription drugs either induce or inhibit CYP34A or P-gp.

While many drugs are deactivated by CYP3A4, there are also some drugs which are activated by the enzyme. Some substances, such as grapefruit juice and some drugs, interfere with the action of CYP3A4. These substances will therefore either amplify or weaken the action of those drugs that are modified by CYP3A4.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CYP3A4

So, what the Xarelto label (warnings) universally adequate in 2015, 2016 or today?

We think not!

 

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