Essure Litigation Against Bayer Survives Preemption Challenge - Cases Remanded to Pennsylvania State Court

Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Is Now The Venue for Filing “Essure” Cases

By Rosemary Pinto, Esq. Feldman & Pinto

And Mark A. York, Mass Tort Nexus

(September 27, 2018)

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) Bayer Corp. and its entities, the makers of Essure, a permanent contraceptive implant subject to thousands of injury reports and repeated safety restrictions by regulators ,said  recently that it will stop selling the device in the U.S., the only country where it remains available.

On July 23, 2018, U.S. District Senior Judge, John R. Padova of the Eastern District of Pennsylvania, ruled  that the federal court did not have jurisdiction over the cases against Bayer Healthcare Pharmaceuticals Inc., and the legal claims over the Essure contraceptive device.

The cases were originally filed in Philadelphia court but were removed by Bayer with the company claiming the removals were proper because the plaintiffs’ claims involved an interpretation of federal law, including Food and Drug Administration regulations.

The company cited a 2017 ruling by a U.S. District Court in North Carolina in another Essure case, Burrell v. Bayer, in which it found that it had federal question jurisdiction because “the labeling of FDA-approved medical devices is governed by the FDA under the MDA, and [the] state law is generally pre-empted under 21 U.S.C. Section 360k.”

But Padova instead followed the lead of courts in the Eastern District of Kentucky and the Eastern District of Missouri, finding that “Congress intended for the state courts to resolve cases such as this one, which ask whether a defendant violated state laws that parallel federal requirements applicable to Essure.”

Bayer argued that the cases were of federal concern because the Essure devices were subject to “stringent federal scrutiny” as Class III medical devices.

“We certainly agree with Bayer that Congress has a significant interest in the regulation of Class III medical devices,” Padova said. Nevertheless, Padova added, the Medical Device Amendments of 1976 “permit individuals to bring state law causes of action alleging violations of duties that parallel the federal requirements. It would be entirely inconsistent with this structure to conclude that Congress intended all such state law causes of action to be brought in federal court.”

Padova also said Bayer failed to identify any disputed federal issue, noting that “the central claims in the complaints are that Bayer violated state law and the complaints merely reference federal law to rebut any argument that their state law claims are preempted.

Feldman Pinto In Philadelphia Provides Insight

Essure Litigation Survives Preemption Challenge, Cases Remanded to State Court

Essure is a birth control device composed of two metal coils implanted in a patient’s fallopian tubes. Women injured by the device have filed more than 16,000 lawsuits against Bayer Healthcare, alleging, among other things, that Bayer failed to provide adequate warnings of severe Essure complications suffered by plaintiffs from device breakage, migration, and / or expulsion. Complications include perforation of fallopian tubes, uteri, rectums, colons, and other organs; severe and chronic pelvic or abdominal pain; and autoimmune diseases.

Essure Claims for Negligent Misrepresentation and Negligent Failure to Warn Survive Preemption Challenge

All of the approximately 16,000 Essure lawsuits in state and federal court exist as individual legal actions rather than class actions or multidistrict litigation. Five such cases were consolidated in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania. Defendants filed motions in all five cases, requesting dismissal of plaintiffs’ claims on the basis of express or implied preemption, failure to state a plausible claim, or failure to plead fraud with particularity.

In March 2016, the court denied defendants’ motions to dismiss plaintiffs’ claims of negligent misrepresentation and negligent failure to warn, holding that the state law claims set forth plausible claims for relief and were not preempted by federal law.

Consolidated Essure Cases Remanded to State Court

In July 2018, the Eastern District of Pennsylvania remanded 19 Essure injury cases to the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas. The district court found that it lacked both diversity of citizenship and federal question subject-matter jurisdiction over the consolidated individual actions and remanded them to state court.

 Essure Statute of Limitations

Defendants in Essure personal injury cases may argue that the statute of limitations period in all Essure cases should begin on November 18, 2016, the date the FDA approved a black box warning (its strongest warning level) for Essure. In reality, the dates triggering Essure limitation periods will vary. The beginning of each plaintiff’s limitation period will depend on the plaintiff’s individual claims and state law applicable to the particular case.

Bayer Stops USA Sales

Bayer announced in June 2018 that it would voluntarily discontinue U.S. sales of Essure by the end of this year “for business reasons” but earlier this month affirmed the safety profile of the device. Last week, Bayer took Netflix to task over the accuracy of its medical device documentary “The Bleeding Edge.” The tide was turning for Bayer at that point, sales were already down 70% after the 2016 FDA warning and the public became aware of the risks of using Essure.

Bayer received FDA approval to sell Essure in 2002 and promoted it as a quick and easy permanent solution to unplanned pregnancies. Essure consists of two thin-as-spaghetti nickel-titanium coils inserted into the fallopian tubes, where they spur the growth of scar tissue that blocks sperm from fertilizing a woman’s eggs.

Because of the reported complaints, the FDA added its most serious warning to the device in 2016 and ordered the company to conduct a 2,000-patient study. FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb said Friday, the agency would work with Bayer to continue the study, but noted “Bayer will not be able to meet its expected enrollment numbers” for new patients. The study was designed to follow patients for three years to better assess complications.

Gottlieb said the FDA will continue to monitor adverse events reported to its database after Essure is removed from the market.  He stated “I also want to reassure women who’ve been using Essure successfully to prevent pregnancy that they can continue to do so,” and added “Those who think it’s causing problems, such as persistent pain, should consult with their doctors,” with Gottlieb further noting that device removal “has its own risks.”

Essure’s original label warned that the device’s nickel can result in allergic reactions. Its current labeling lists hives, rash, swelling and itching as possible reactions.

But many women have attributed other problems to the implant, including mood disorders, weight gain, hair loss and headaches. Those problems are listed in the current FDA labeling for the device, with the qualifier: “It is unknown if these symptoms are related to Essure or other causes.”

Informational material Bayer supplied to doctors and patients lists potential problems and states the devices are meant to be permanent. It also says removal may require complicated surgery, including a hysterectomy, that might not be covered by insurance.

Non-Profit Weighs In

Diana Zuckerman, president of the nonprofit National Center for Health Research, said Essure is among medical devices approved without “clear evidence of safety or effectiveness. As a result, when thousands of women reported serious complications from Essure, there was no unbiased long-term research to refute or confirm those reports” she also stated, “If patients had been listened to when the first clinical trials were conducted on Essure, better research would have been conducted to determine exactly how safe and effective Essure is.”

 Feldman & Pinto is Representing Plaintiffs in Essure Litigation

The Philadelphia personal injury firm of Feldman & Pinto concentrates its practice in plaintiffs’ drug and medical device injury litigation. Each of the firm’s attorneys has more than 20 years’ experience trying personal injury and wrongful death cases in state and federal court. Feldman & Pinto currently represents plaintiffs in approximately 20 Essure injury cases in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas.  Attorney Rosemary Pinto can be contacted at rpinto@feldmanpinto.com.

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