$35 Million In Punitives Added To Bard TVM Trial Verdict in NJ Court

“TOTAL VERDICT OF $68 MILLION IN SYNTHETIC SURGICAL MESH TRIAL”

Mark A. York (April 18, 2018)

SYNTHETIC MESH COMPANIES FACING THOUSAND OF LAWSUITS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) C.R. Bard, Inc. was ordered to pay an additional $35 million in punitive damages, added to the $33 million the jury initially award for a total of verdict of $68 million in the first Transvaginal Mesh trial for Bard in New Jersey state court. Plaintiff Mary McGinnis was successful in her claims that Bard’s synthetic vaginal mesh implants are defective, asserting that Bard defectively designed the product, ignored warnings and related FDA notices about the numerous adverse events related to their synthetic surgical mesh products.

Bard, a subsidiary of global medical supplier Becton-Dickinson of Franklin Lakes, says it will appeal the verdict. In a statement, the company said McGinnis knew of the inherent risks in having the vaginal implants. This case docket can be found under Mary McGinnis and Thomas Walsh McGinnis v. C.R. Bard Inc., et al., case number BER-L-17543-14, Bergen County Superior Court, Judge James DeLuca.

The punitive damage award was added after the initial $33 million verdict was returned and the judge set a hearing to address the punitive damages award. The jury decided that there were grounds to award plaintiff Mary McGinnis and her husband the large verdict based on trial testimony and evidence that Bard was aware of the mesh product dangers and chose to ignore the thousands of adverse events reported related to post-surgery complications claimed by women across the country.

The Bard synthetic mesh products are designed to provide pelvic support for any number of medical issues primarily affecting women, with synthetic mesh recognized as often causing major medical complications and leaving patients in permanent pain. The jury held the company liable for two products that McGinnis had implanted in March of 2009: an Avaulta Solo mesh, and an Align Transobturator and Bard was forced to concede that both products have been taken off the market.

The verdict comes as Murray Hill, New Jersey-based Bard is pushing to a flood of litigation its surgical mesh implants , which have been criticized by women for damaging internal and often affecting or stopping normal sex lives. Bard has settled more than 13,000 cases since 2014, and as of September 2017, the company still faced more than 3,000 suits over allegedly defective synthetic mesh devices still in litigation. Those cases are part of the Bard-TVM-Litigation-MDL-2187 Briefcase, in front of Judge Goodwin, US District Court of West Virginia.  While Bard still faces another 150 lawsuits in New Jersey state court, which previously had been perceived as a favorable home court legal venue by the company.

McGinnis alleged Bard’s Avaulta and Align implants shrank after being implanted, causing nerve damage and leaving her unable to engage in sexual activity and that she was forced to undergo four surgeries in attempts to remove all the mesh from her body.

Bard took the Avaulta implants off the market in 2012 and did the same with the Align inserts in 2016. The company chose to remove the products the day after the U.S. Food and Drug Administration in 2010 ordered Bard and other mesh-manufacturers, including Johnson & Johnson (Ethicon), Boston Scientific and Endo (American Medical S), to review their mesh products, which also resulted in J&J removing four lines of synthetic surgical mesh products from the market.J&J’s Ethicon subsidiary is facing more than 50 thousand lawsuits regarding its synthetic mesh device in Ethicon (J&J) Pelvic Mesh TVM Litigation MDL-2327.

The Ethicon MDL is in the same West Virginia federal court as the Bard and other mesh manufacturer multidistrict litigation, which are all being heard by Judge Goodwin.  Judge Goodwin has previously expressed his frustration with the parties not engaging in substantive settlements discussions to resolve the thousands of cases, the one option he has is to begin remanding cases back for trial in court venues around the country, possibly forcing both sides to begin earnest settlement talks. Goodwin has held hearings with leadership attorneys from both sides appearing before the court to possibly kickstart settlements. He has gone so far as to warn mesh manufacturers that if they do not settle, U.S. juries appear poised to inflict hundreds of millions, or even billions, of dollars in compensatory and punitive damages on them in thousands of cases that would overload the federal judicial system for years to come.

Bard has been accused in many lawsuits of using a form of polypropylene mesh in the devices, that their mesh supplier and manufacturer had warned wasn’t suitable for human implantation. Bard officials countered that the mesh was a safe substance from which to make the inserts, ignoring the safety sheet warning issued by the polypropylene mesh product maker.

Last year, C.R. Bard was acquired by medical-device company Becton, Dickinson & Co. $24 billion, combining two of the world’s biggest health-care suppliers.  How the thousands of remaining mesh lawsuits affect the company business model and potentially moves them towards serious settlement discussions remains to be seen.

This case can be found at: Mary McGinnis v. C.R. Bard, Inc., Docket No.: BERL1754314, Bergen County, New Jersey Superior Court (Hackensack).

 


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