Bard Loses $33 Million In Pelvic Repair Mesh Trial In New Jersey State Court: Punitive Damage Hearings Today

“New Jersey State Courts Not Legal Safe Haven Lately For Companies HQ’d There”

By Mark A. York (April 13, 2018)

C.R. Bard Avaulta Synthetic Surgical Mesh

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) In another win for plaintiffs, a jury in Bergen County, New Jersey awarded plaintiff Mary McGinnis $23 million and her husband Thomas, an additional $10 million in actual damages, with a hearing taking place today on how much in punitive damages will be be added. This $33 million verdict in New Jersey state court, where defendant C.R. Bard is headquartered, closely follows the $117 million verdict of last week against another New Jersey company, Johnson & Johnson in a baby powder trial.  This was the first C. R. Bard case to go to trial in the Bard consolidated New Jersey state court docket, where Bard is facing hundreds of additional lawsuits over its defective pelvic mesh implants, also known as Transvaginal Mesh or TVM.

The jury directed the company to pay the $33 million in compensatory damages over claims the business knew its pelvic mesh products were unsafe and failed to warn doctors about potential risks related to devices that caused a woman debilitating pain and related inability to enjoy life as she did prior to the surgical implant of the synthetic mesh device.  Bard and others makers of both TVM and hernia mesh products are under highly increased scrutiny and being hot with major trial verdicts over claims they ignored the dangers of implanting synthetic mesh products, primarily made from polypropylene, the same product most fishing line is made from, into the human body. This case docket can be found under- Mary McGinnis and Thomas Walsh McGinnis v. C.R. Bard Inc., et al., case number BER-L-17543-14, Bergen County Superior Court, Judge James DeLuca.

The jury took less than a day to decide on the verdict following the four-week trial, after finding that Bard was responsible for a defective design of the Avaulta mesh product and failure to warn doctors or consumers of the defective design. . Of note is that Bard had removed the Avaulta mesh line from the market by 2016.

The jury found that Bard’s Avaulta and Align synthetic mesh products, which were  implanted to treat McGinnis’s bladder prolapse and stress urinary incontinence were defectively designed and caused incapacitating injuries as well as impacting her relationship with her husband. Bard claimed repeatedly that they tested Avaulta extensively as well as their other mesh products, and Mrs. McGinnis’ unrelated medical conditions caused her injuries

Hearings over punitive damages and how much they should be are scheduled to start this morning. Bard is probably keeping in mind the $80 million in punitive damages awarded last week in a similar state court punitive damages hearing in the J&J talcum powder cancer trial in New Brunswick, which is less than 50 miles from the Bergen County court.

Bard has historically been hit with ongoing verdicts over its synthetic mesh line of products in trial across the country, as far back as 2012 where a previous Avaulta mesh trial in California state court ended in a $5.5 million verdict and in a 2013 West Virginia federal court trial, a verdict was returned for  $2 million verdict against Bard and its Avaulta mesh.

TVM MESH IS SUBJECT TO MAJOR LITIGATION

Surgical Mesh Makers Facing Litigation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Major litigation against CR. Bard/Davol, Ethicon (J&J), Boston Scientific and other surgical mesh manufacturers has been ongoing for few years in both federal and state courts and will continue into the foreseeable future, based on the hundreds of thousands of synthetic mesh implants used in surgical procedures in the United States over the last 15 years.

Bard has been known to settle mesh cases, in the Wise v. Bard, bellwether case selection, that was set for trial back on February 18, 2015, settled a week before the trail start date for a confidential amount. The Wise lawsuit was part of the Bard MDL 2187, see Bard-TVM-Litigation-MDL-2187 Briefcase, where thousands of lawsuits are still pending against C.R. Bard, additionally there are other MDL’s where every other synthetic surgical mesh manufacturer in the US marketplace is facing more than 50 thousand lawsuits over their synthetic mesh surgical products.” See Ethicon (J&J) Pelvic Mesh Litigation MDL-2327-TVM Briefcase.

OTHER TVM MESH VERDICTS

 There were $26.7 million and $18.5 million mesh verdicts against Boston Scientific see  Boston-Scientific-TVM-Litigation-MDL-2362 Briefcase, in two transvaginal mesh MDL trials. On November 13, 2014, a Miami, Florida jury awarded $26.7 million to four women implanted with Boston Scientific’s Pinnacle mesh devices. On November 20, 2014,  a Charleston, West Virginia jury awarded $18.5 million to four women implanted with Boston Scientific’s Obtryx mid-urethral slings. The Obtryx verdict included $4 million in punitive damages, with $1 million awarded to each plaintiff.

The women in the Florida Pinnacle trial were each awarded between $6.5 million and $6.7 million. Boston Scientific’s Pinnacle mesh devices were implanted during pelvic organ prolapse surgeries and are no longer on the market. The individual awards for the women in the Pinnacle mesh trial include:

Transvaginal Mesh Adverse Events

Transvaginal mesh and vaginal sling products have been linked to thousands of reported serious, life-threatening side effects or adverse events from seven surgical mesh manufacturers. The complications are associated with surgical mesh devices used to repair Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI). The mesh devices are typically placed transvaginally for minimally invasive placement.

Complications and Adverse Events Include:

  • erosion through the vaginal tissue
  • mesh contraction
  • mesh extrusion
  • inflammation
  • fistula
  • infection and abscess
  • pain
  • blood loss
  • chronic and acute nerve damage
  • pudendal nerve damage
  • pelvic floor damage
  • scar tissue
  • chronic pelvic pain
  • urinary problems and/or incontinence
  • recurrence of prolapse
  • bowel, bladder, and blood vessel perforation
  • dyspareunia or pain during sexual intercourse

Treatment of the complications includes additional surgical procedures to revise or remove the mesh, blood transfusions, drainage of hematomas, drainage of abscesses from infection, IV medication, pain injections, botox injections, physical therapy, among other treatments to alleviate the complications.

In July 1, 2012, Bard stopped selling the Avaulta Meshin the United States because the FDA required additional clinical trials and testing.

On June 4, 2012: Johnson and Johnson/Ethicon withdrewfour mesh products from the US Market, including its controversialGynecare Prolift, Prolift+ M, TVT Secur and Prosima systems.

History of Warnings

Surgical mesh is a metallic or polymeric screen surgically implanted to reinforce and support weakened soft tissue or bone. On the market since the 1950s for use in abdominal hernias, gynecologists in the 1970s began using surgical mesh to reinforce vaginal tissue to treat pelvic organ prolapse. In the 1990s, surgeons began using surgical mesh to treat stress urinary incontinence in women.

Transvaginal mesh was approved for sale through the 510(k) process simply by comparing it to the kind of mesh used to treat abdominal hernias. Most transvaginal mesh products on the market today are based on Boston Scientific Corp.’s ProteGen mesh, which the FDA approved in 1996 as the first surgical mesh to treat stress urinary incontinence. Two years later, the FDA approved Johnson & Johnson’s Gynecare TVT mesh through the 510(k) process after the company claimed the mesh was substantially equivalent to ProteGen.

However, in October, 1999, the FDA recalled Boston Scientific’s ProteGen sling due to the large number of complications experienced by women, including erosion of the vaginal tissues. The complete irony is that a majority of the transvaginal mesh are based upon this recalled defective device.

On October 20, 2008, the U.S. Food & Drug Administration (FDA) issued an urgent public health notification to physicians and patients regarding serious complications associated with transvaginal placement of surgical mesh in repair of Pelvic Organ Prolapse (POP) and Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI).

On May 16, 2011, the New England Journal of Medicine (NEJM) Study on Transvaginal Mesh Complications confirmed that the use of surgical mesh to treat pelvic organ prolapse carries the risk of serious side effects including bladder perforation and pelvic hemorrhaging.

On July 13, 2011, FDA issued an updated safety communication warning that surgical placement of transvaginal mesh to repair POP may expose patients to a greater risk of side effects than other treatment options. In addition to the increased risk of side effects, the FDA stated that vaginal mesh offers no greater clinical value or improved quality of lifeover other surgical methods.

On August 25, 2011, Public Citizen called on FDA to recall the vaginal mesh in response to a high number of reports linking vaginal mesh products to erosion, pain, bleeding and urinary incontinence.

Transvaginal Mesh Products & Manufacturers

Ethicon

  • Secure
  • Prolift
  • Prolift +M
  • Gynemesh/Gynemesh PS
  • Prosima
  • TVT
  • TVT-Obturator (TVT-O)
  • TVT-SECUR (TVT-S)
  • TVT-Exact
  • TVT-Abbrevo
  1. R. Bard
  • Align
  • Avaulta Plus™ BioSynthetic Support System
  • Avaulta Solo™ Synthetic Support System
  • Faslata® Allograft
  • Pelvicol® Tissue
  • PelviSoft® Biomesh
  • Pelvitex™ Polypropylene Mesh
  • PelviLace
  • InnerLace
  • Uretex

American Medical Systems 

  • SPARC®
  • Mini-Arc
  • Apogee
  • Elevate
  • Monarc
  • In-Fast
  • BioArc

Boston Scientific

  • Obtryx® Curved Single
  • Obtryx® Mesh Sling
  • Obtryx Transobturator Mid-Urethral Sling System
  • Prefyx Mid U™ Mesh Sling System
  • Prefyx PPS™ System
  • Uphold Vaginal Support System
  • Pinnacle Pelvic Floor Repair Kit
  • Advantage Transvaginal Mid-Urethral Sling System
  • Advantage Fit System
  • Solyx SIS System

Coloplast

  • T-Sling-Universal Polypropylene Sling

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