C. R. Bard, Inc., Hit With Multimillion Dollar IVC Filter Jury Verdict in Arizona Federal Court

Plaintiff Wins the First Bellwether Trial in Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation MDL 2641

By Mark A. York (March 30, 2018)

Bard G2 Inferior Vena Cava Filter

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(Mass Tort Nexus Media)  A Phoenix federal jury awarded $2 million in compensatory damages on Friday to plaintiff Sherr-Una Booker, in the first bellwether trial against IVC filter maker Bard, Inc. and affiliate company Bard Peripheral Vascular, Inc. finding that the clot-stopping vein filter known as a G2 model IVC filter, (an Inferior Vena Cava filter) manufactured by Bard broke apart in her body, and returned a verdict citing that the device maker was responsible for 80 percent of the harm. They also said that Bard is liable for punitive damages in addition to the $2 million in actual damages award, with the hearing on punitive damages taking place right after the initial verdict announcement.

The punitive damages phase of the first bellwether over the IVC device began immediately after the early Friday verdict in the Sherr-Una Booker v. C.R. Bard, Inc et al, Case No. 16-CV-0474-PHX-DCG litigation, US District Court of Arizona in front of Judge David G. Campbell.  The Booker trial is the first “bellwether trial” in the more than 3,500 other IVC filter lawsuits pending in the Bard IVC Filters Litigation MDL 2641, before Judge Campbell. The verdict came fairly quickly after just six-and-a-half hours of deliberations that started Thursday. The jury said Bard was not liable for strict liability, which will probably be appealed by Ms. Bookers counsel. We will update this article with the results of the punitive damage hearing as soon as they become available.

BARD IVC FILTER PROBLEMS

Bard’s IVC filters, including its Recovery, G2, Meridian, and Denali product lines, are the target of over 3,500 injury claims in the Bard IVC Filters Products Liability Litigation MDL 2641 currently pending before the court in the District of Arizona. The thousands of lawsuits  filed against the two Bard companies claim they concealed dangerous side effects associated with their retrievable IVC filters – including filter migration, fracture, organ perforation, embolization, and inferior vena cava punctures – and failed to warn doctors and patients about these risks. In addition to the Bard MDL 2641 cases, there is other litigation against smaller IVC manufacturers, Cordis Corporation Rex Medical, Argon Medical, and B. Braun who are all facing  IVC lawsuits in state and federal courts across the country.

BARD FAILURE TO WARN

IVC filters are implanted into the inferior vena cava – the body’s largest blood vessel – to intercept blood clots before they can travel to the heart and lungs. The devices are indicated for patients at risk for pulmonary embolism, and who are unable to use standard blood-thinning medications. The filters involved in the C.R. Bard and Cook Medical litigations are retrievable, and are intended to be removed once a patient is no longer at risk for pulmonary embolism.

Plaintiffs pursuing IVC filter lawsuits against C.R. Bard and Cook Medical claim that the companies failed to provide doctors with adequate warnings and instructions for removal. They also claim that the devices are defectively designed, and accuse the two companies of concealing the risks associated with their blood clot filters.

The FDA has issued two safety alerts about using retrievable IVC filters.

  • The first was released in August 2010, after the devices were linked to hundreds of adverse events, including reports of filters fracturing and migrating to other areas of the body. In other cases, pieces of the filters perforated organs and blood vessels.
  • The FDA issued a second alert in May 2014 to remind doctors of the importance of IVC filter retrieval. A year earlier, a paper published in JAMA Internal Medicine found only 8.5% of retrievable IVC filters were successfully removed.

“In conclusion, our research suggests that the frequent use of IVC filters for VTE treatment and prophylaxis, combined with a low retrieval rate and inconsistent use of anticoagulant therapy, results in suboptimal outcomes, such as mechanical filter failure and high rates of VTE,” the authors of the report concluded. “More comprehensive longitudinal data would likely identify additional complications.”

Additional research has shown in the last 30 years an estimated 30,000 IVC filters have been implanted. But it wasn’t until 2010, after they’d received thousands of adverse event reports, that the FDA finally issued a warning citing the risk of retrievable filter injuries. It took another four years for the FDA to strengthen the warning when in 2014 they implored doctors to remove IVC filters within about one to two months after the risk of a pulmonary embolism has lessened.

BARD KNEW OF DANGERS

In 2015 after the FDA issued the second IVC warning, a bombshell media report claimed C.R. Bard continued to market and sell their inferior vena cava (IVC) filters even after the company became aware the filters were failing and causing serious injuries and even death. The report went on to link at least 27 deaths and more than 300 injuries to failures associated with C.R. Bards Recovery Model IVC filters. The investigative report also uncovered that IVC devices made by C.R. Bard and Cook Medical had been linked to hundreds of adverse event reports where they punctured the vena cava, tilted out of position or migrated or broke apart and caused metallic fragments to travel to the heart or lungs – a condition known as embolization. Even after C.R. Bard was warned about the problems, they continued to sell the devices, without warning the doctors of the defects and injuries.

With 3,500 additional cases remaining the the Bard IVC Filter litigation docket, it seems that the Bard entities may need to prepare for a long and protracted legal fight, unless they determine settlement discussions are the best legal strategy to prevent future plaintiff wins.

 

 

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