New York City sues Big Pharma over opioids - joining Chicago, Seattle, Milwaukee and other major cities

New York City Joins Chicago, Seattle, Milwaukee in Suing Opioid Industry Players

“PROFITS OVER PATIENTS BY BIG PHARMA CONTINUES”

 

MAJOR CITIES SUE BIG PHARMA OVER OPIOIDS

 

                                           

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(MASS TORT NEXUS MEDIA) New York City has filed a lawsuit against pharmaceutical companies that make or distribute prescription opioids, on Tuesday the complaint was filed in New York state court, Superior Court of Manhattan, which is a break from other Opioid lawsuits filed by cities, who filed into federal court, see OPIOID-CRISIS: MDL-2804-OPIATE-PRESCRIPTION-LITIGATION. The primary claims state that the opiate drug companies fueled the deadly epidemic now afflicting the most populous U.S. city, joining Chicago, Seattle, Milwaukee and other major cities across the country in holding Big Pharma drug makers accountable for the opioid crisis.

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio stated the lawsuit seeks $500 million in  damages to help fight the crisis, which kills more people in the city annually than homicides and car accidents combined, which at last count was more than 1,100 from opioid-induced overdoses in 2016.

He also clarified “Big Pharma helped to fuel this epidemic by deceptively peddling these dangerous drugs and hooking millions of Americans in exchange for profit,” making his point clear as to where responsibility for the opioid crisis rests.

Named defendants include manufacturers Allergan Plc (AGN.N), Endo International Plc (ENDP.O), Johnson & Johnson (JNJ.N), Purdue Pharma LP and Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd (TEVA.TA), and distributors AmerisourceBergen Corp (ABC.N), Cardinal Health Inc (CAH.N) and McKesson Corp (MCK.N), sourced from Reuters.

 

All were accused in the city’s complaint of creating a public nuisance, and the distributors were cited for negligence. The same allegations have been asserted in other complaints, including RICO claims by many plaintiffs who assert the companies conspired and created the opioid crisis by developing questionable opioid marketing plans, including offering financial incentives and making payments directly to doctors and others to write opiate prescriptions.

Allergan, Endo, J&J, Purdue, Teva, AmerisourceBergen and McKesson have all stated that they historically emphasized the importance of using opioids safely, in their business operations

BIG PHARMA OFF-LABEL DRUG ABUSES

Endo, J&J and Purdue denied the city’s allegations, with McKesson and Cardinal Health not immediately responding to requests for comment. All companies listed in the complaint have repeatedly been cited, fined and entered into consent decrees with the federal and state governments regarding questionable marketing practices related to prescription drugs. Often these fines have totaled hundreds of millions of dollars and never admit liability, simply agreeing to stop the cited activity, which as reflected in the hundreds of opioid based complaint recently filed, the agreement to cease and desist in “off label” or inappropriate drug marketing efforts has not been applied to the opiate prescription industry.

New York City, with over 4 million residents, has joined a long list of U.S. states and municipalities suing drug companies over opioid abuse, often referring to the drug makers “off label” use, where sales reps have continuously pushed an agenda of the opiates being “non-addictive” and part of proper healthcare.

OPIATES: A PUBLIC HEALTH EMERGENCY

The national opioid crisis incited President Trump to designate the it as a national public health emergency in November 2107, and the administration extended the emergency as of January 19, 2018. Although it should be noted that President Trump has not applied any federal funding to the now official “public health emergency” thereby leaving the state and local governments to push forward in the efforts to combat the opioid crisis on their own.

Opioids, including prescription painkillers and heroin, played a role in 42,249 U.S. deaths in 2016, up 28 percent from 2015 and 47 percent from 2014, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

The complaint filed in state court in Manhattan, New York accused manufacturers of having for two decades misled consumers into believing that prescription opioids were safe to treat chronic non-cancer pain, with minimal risk of addiction.

The distributors played a part in opioid abuse through oversupply, including failing to identify suspicious orders and report them to authorities, including the DEA and other oversight agencies, contributing to an illegal secondary market in prescription opioids, such as Purdue’s OxyContin, Endo’s Percocet and Insys Therapeutics fentanyl drug Subsys, a fast acting and extremely addictive drug.

MILLIONS OF PILLS PRESCRIBED

Almost 2.75 million opioid prescriptions were filled in New York City each year from 2014 to 2016. Which is a very high number for a major city, but not nearly the millions of opiate prescriptions written in the more rural regions of Ohio, West Virginia and Kentucky, where the number of opiates prescribed equaled 100 plus pills per month for every resident in these state, with West Virginia numbers being 780 million painkillers in six years.

As more and more cities, states and counties files suits against the opiate drug industry as a whole, there will be a appoint where Big pharm will have to decide whether to admit it’s fault in the opioid crisis, or simply continue to evade responsibility and leave the process up to lawyers and the courts to simply assign a financial penalty for the alleged corporate opioid abuses.

The case docket information is: City of New York v Purdue Pharma LP et al, New York State Supreme Court, New York County, No. 450133/2018.

 


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