Johnson & Johnson’s Ethicon Files Appeal in Court Ruling Where Defense Verdict in Mesh Trial Sidestepped By Judge

Plaintiffs Gets a Second Chance After Defense Trial Verdict

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In another legal slam against Johnson & Johnson and their Ethicon mesh division, plaintiff Kimberly Adkins, who’s trial in June 2017 ended in a defense verdict, has been granted new life. In post trial pleadings, the judge granted the plaintiff’s petition for a hearing on damages, after determining that the jury findings had found the mesh was designed defectively, even though they entered a defense verdict. The manufacturer of the pelvic mesh involved, Ethicon Inc. (Ethicon), has appealed the judge’s ruling, when he ruled the matter can proceed to a damages hearing. In so doing, Ms. Adkins’ lawsuit, related to a TVT Secur mesh implant surgical deveice, has been revived, at least for the time being.
The primary defendant in the surgical mesh side effects lawsuit is Ethicon, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, is now facing more than 100 lawsuits in the pelvic mesh mass torts currently consolidated in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas, Philadelphia. In what was the fifth case in the mass torts docket to go to trial, the jury on June 9 delivered for Ethicon, with what was  defendant’s first win in the 5 cases heard to date. Ethicon faces many thousands of other mesh lawsuits in federal and state courts across the country, and to date, have mounted vigorous defense in all cases.

Shortly after the defense verdict, Ms. Adkins’ trial team responded with a post-trial motion asserting that the jury’s findings were inconsistent with regard to the issue of whether or not a design defect, alleged in the surgical mesh complications lawsuit (a defect acknowledged by the jury) had been the cause of injuries to Adkins. They also stated that she was entitled to a review of the claim for damages based on the jury design defect determination.

The focus by plaintiffs is, that the jury had determined the Ethicon TVT-Secur mesh implanted in Adkins had, indeed been designed with certain defects. But in their verdict determination, by failing to identify that the product that may have caused Adkins’ injuries went against the weight of the evidence.

Adkins’ post-trial petition found merit with the judge in the Philadelphia Court, who revived the surgical mesh lawsuit in July and directed that the case be set for a hearing related to damages.

Ethicon promptly filed an appeal of the judge’s ruling with the Pennsylvania Superior Court. A spokesperson for Ethicon, Kristen Wallace, said in a statement that the trial jury in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas had, indeed determined that the Ethicon surgical mesh had not been the cause of the plaintiff’s injuries.

“We have filed an appeal to the Superior Court solely regarding the court granting a new hearing on damages, because we believe that it was not right to set aside what the jury decided,” Wallace said.

Adkins’ legal team announced it would be opposing the appeal, noting that any further delays incurred by Ethicon’s now standard legal strategy of appealing all rulings to delay final determination, will only delay the final determination of damages being awarded to the plaintiff, for the harm, and suffering experienced after she received the Ethicon TVT Secur mesh implant.

The primary plaintiff claims are that Adkins suffered extensive post-surgical injuries, when the Ethicon TVT Secur implant eroded into the plaintiff’s vaginal canal, causing Adkins severe and ongoing pain, after a portion of the surgical mesh was removed by way of follow up surgical procedure in September, 2012 – however the pain continued. even in the aftermath of the revision surgery. The plaintiff has been unable to return to the pre-implant active lifestyle she enjoyed including being unable to enjoy normal sexual relations with her partner of 20 years.

Ms. Adkins initially filed her complaint related to surgical mesh complications in July, 2013. The case is Kimberly Adkins v. Ethicon Inc. et al., Case No. 130700919, in the Court of Common Pleas of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania.


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