Attorneys Mistakenly Turn Down Xarelto Cases When Death Certificate Omits Internal Bleeding

John Ray has been a leading consultant to the Mass Tort industry for over a decade. His unique skill sets make him well suited to both teaching and consulting in the Mass Tort arena.
John Ray has been a leading consultant to the Mass Tort industry for over a decade. His unique skill sets make him well suited to both teaching and consulting in the Mass Tort arena.

By John Ray.

Even as Xarelto litigation grows ahead of the first bellwether trial in federal court MDL No. 2592, some plaintiff attorneys are mistakenly turning down cases if the death certificate does not specifically mention internal bleeding or ischemic stroke.

In our consulting practice at Mass Tort Nexus we are often asked if the cause of death listed on a death certificate does not mention bleeding or ischemic stroke deal — is that a fatal obstacle to filing a wrongful death case related to Xarelto, Pradaxa or Eliquis?

The simple answer is, possibly but often not.

Many mass tort lawyers see the upcoming bellwether trials on April 24 and May 30 as an opportune time to start or expand a Xarelto product liability practice. So far 15,611 cases lawsuits have been filed before US District Judge Eldon E. Fallon in Louisiana, up from 10,769 cases in September 2016. 

The federal lawsuits stem from allegations that the anticoagulant Xarelto could cause uncontrollable bleeding and hemorrhagic strokes. They accuse the drug’s manufacturers — Bayer Healthcare and Johnson & Johnson subsidiary Janssen Pharmaceuticals — of failing to warn about Xarelto’s potential risks. 

In parallel state court litigation in Pennsylvania, Judge Arnold L. New in the Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas amended the master and short form complaint to allow for Ischemic Stroke Claims to be made in that court.

What a death certificate is — and isn’t

A  death certificate is document that serves primarily as a public record of an individual’s death. These records are often used in a variety of statistical analysis.

The cause of death (COD) noted on a death certificate is not intended to be an expansive diagnostic review of all medical events that led to the death. In some cases, the person who issued the death certificate may not even be a medical practitioner.

In reviewing blood-thinners Xarelto, Pradaxa and Eliquis cases, the COD listed on the death certificate may not mention bleeding or any other condition known to directly occur as a result of using these drugs however,  this does not necessarily mean that it cannot be determined by a preponderance of the evidence that the given anticoagulant did not cause or contribute to the death.

Example: The cause of death on a death certificate may list heart attack, myocardial infarction or cardiac insult as well as other terms that fall under the more general term “heart attack.”

Should one automatically assume that the death, under this circumstance, cannot be attributed to the use of Xarelto, Pradaxa or Eliquis?  No!

Bleeding can cause heart attack

Do not allow the cause of death listed on a death certificate be the final determining factor in whether you continue to pursue a wrongful death action.

There is ample evidence in the medical literature “heart attacks” can be secondary to bleeding events. Heart attacks can be caused by sudden significant increases and decreases in blood pressure as well as the heart being deprived of oxygen, delivered by adequate blood flow.

If the death certificate lists any form of “heart attack” as the cause of death, further investigation is warranted to determine whether the use of any of the aforementioned drugs could have reasonably caused or contributed to the heart attack.

  • A significant bleed within two or three weeks before the heart attack resulting in death will have more likely than not caused or contributed to the heart attack.
  • A significant bleed can lead to permanent heart damage and can cause or contribute to a heart attack months or even years after the bleeding event. Obviously, the less time there is between the bleeding event and the heart attack makes for a less difficult argument.

It should be noted that in cases where the patient had a history of heart attacks or conditions which are known to lead to heart attacks such as late stage diabetes, for example, may make it more difficult to prevail in your argument.

When analyzing whether the bleeding event may have caused or contributed to the cause of death listed on the death certificate, it is important to understand a basic fact:

Bleeding is never the actual cause of death — events secondary to bleeding are the actual cause of death.

This statement can be difficult to wrap one’s head around as the term “bled to death” is so commonly used and is not inaccurate in the broadest sense. However, from a physiological perspective the true cause of death is always secondary to loss of blood. If insufficient blood volume exists vital organs that are highly dependent on oxygen and fluid volume can quickly fail resulting in death.

The takeaway from this article is: Do not allow the cause of death listed on a death certificate be the determining factor in whether you continue to pursue a wrongful death action.

Once you have a death certificate in hand, review the cause of death listed on the death certificate. After ascertaining the COD listed on the death certificate, as a first step simply Google “Can Bleeding Result in (insert cause of death listed).”

If the cause of death listed a condition that can be attributed to bleeding, then further review of the patient’s pre-death medical records is warranted to determine if there is a strong argument that the bleeding event caused or contributed to the condition listed on the death certificate.

Two Cautions

Late-stage cancers, particularly pancreatic and liver cancer, often result in bleeding regardless of whether the patient is receiving anticoagulant therapy or not. If the cause of death listed is a type of cancer that has a high mortality rate in late stages, then is would be far more difficult to argue that it was more likely than not that the anticoagulant caused the death versus the cancer.

In some cases, the cause of death may be listed as “natural causes” or even “old age.” Although no one dies of natural causes or old age, if such terms are listed as the COD, it may be more difficult, although not impossible, to show that the death was caused by the use of the anticoagulant. To demonstrate that the anticoagulant more likely than not caused or contributed to the death, medical records demonstrating a circumstance that would almost certainly lead to death would be needed.

This article is not intended to be medical or legal advice. Our goal is to provide issues to consider when evaluating Xarelto, Pradaxa and Eliquis cases as well as other cases in which the content of this article may apply.


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